Sunday, 28 July 2013

if this were a fairy tale, and she the sleeping beauty...






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12 comments:

  1. ...then I would be the beast.

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    1. isn't the beast from a different story? :-)
      or you want to be the beast in _every_ story? :-P

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  2. cat ma farmeca intotdeauna aceste ferestre postcomuniste:) - este acolo tot ce au trait ele,plus libertatea noastra de acum de a face bloguri cu si despre ele, tot ce a trecut indica cumva ideea unui palimpsest,cu umbrele fostelor hieroglife inca prezente,si poate doar mireasma lor eleganta face o punte peste timp,nu stiu; este atat de frumoasa...

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    1. si m s-a indragostit de ele :-)

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  3. A thorny topic. (-;

    There's a bleakness about this, though I wonder what role the post-communist tag has had in contributing to this.

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    1. ah yes, that is the problem with giving titles to photos, i have an issue with this, it already sets a frame for "reading" the image...

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  4. It is a fairy tale but, rather inconveniently, she isn't sleeping beauty. The book of stories (too flighty to be of any practicable use) to which you allude has been replaced with a more robust, modern, politically correct book of hyperbolic tales. This happens every so often and one would be well advised to keep up with the new, rather iridescent kernels of truth contained within these crisp, au courant pages. Der Froschkönig oder der eiserne Heinrich, for instance, has been thoroughly revised. And thank goodness. No doubt a nod to Kafka, the frog has been recast as an ungeheures ungeziefer, and he has an entanglement with a verminous yet slatternly creature (suggestions of incest are rife, though these are vehemently denied by Marxist sympathizers). I realize that you may feel that I have drifted ever so slightly from the topic of windows and curtains, but I felt it was my duty to help you to better understand the complex, so-beautiful-at-dawn world we happen to share.

    N.B. I have had occasion to notice that you struggle with the German language. Might I suggest that you befriend a Mercedes-Benz employee in your area and ask for help? Don’t mention Kafka because you may be detained by endless existential babble and consequently miss the last bus home.

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    1. how extraordinary! i have recently read that they have published a version of Kafka's stories for children, here:
      http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/06/kafka-for-kids.html

      or is it that you know i am currently in the middle of rereading all of his work?!! (she is of the old-fashioned belief that reading a couple of big authors, say Proust and Kafka and one or two others, deeply and repeatedly, does one more good than scattered reading of thousands of lists of books).

      but maybe it is just that Kafka's name is bound to pop up every time a postcommunist window is shown, and i can understand that very well...

      (oh yes, and i am laughing :-)

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  5. this is beautiful my friend, but it leads me to suffer, through a dream of black blood dripping from the shadows to remain alive against the stone walls it is beautiful because there is beauty in suffering and I love the tension of this title it is as if the beauty is sleeping so there is hope that she willbe awakened.the beauty that is and I define beauty as appreciation of life the light blossoming through stone walls that is why we require fairy tales.
    HUGS♥
    have an awesome day Roxana et merci beaucoup!

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    1. yes, there is always hope, and i don't know what we would do without fairy tales, Madeleine. you know that better than me, as you write them :-)
      bises d'aout, pleines de soleil...

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  6. AND perhaps beauty can be revealed in suffering because suffering is the only way we can ascend.
    HUGS

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  7. Agreed about the pretext influencing the viewing. Especially after having seen your vilnius branches. (-:

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